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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and Denmark found in the catalog.

Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and Denmark

Helen Grue

Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and Denmark

by Helen Grue

  • 182 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Vildtbiologisk Station in Rønde .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Greenland,
  • Denmark
    • Subjects:
    • Arctic fox -- Age determination.,
    • Teeth.,
    • Cementum.,
    • Mammals -- Age determination.,
    • Mammals -- Greenland -- Age determination.,
    • Mammals -- Denmark -- Age determination.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesAnnual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes ...
      Statementby Helen Grue & Birger Jensen.
      SeriesDanish review of game biology ;, v. 10, no. 3, Communication from Vildtbiologisk Station ;, no. 135
      ContributionsJensen, Birger, joint author.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQL1 .D3 vol. 10, no. 3, QL737.C22 .D3 vol. 10, no. 3
      The Physical Object
      Pagination11, [1] p. :
      Number of Pages11
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3134120M
      LC Control Number82461136

      Grue H. and Jensen B. Annular structures in canine tooth cementum in red foxes of known age. - Danish Review of Game Biology 8: 1– Grue H. and Jensen B. Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and Denmark. - Danish Review of Game Biology 1– Arctic foxes have a central nervous system which consists of the brain and spinal cord only. This is where the sensory information is sent and also where actions and reflexes are coordinated. Neurons are an important part of the nervous system. There are three types of neurons which are the sensory neurons, relay neurons, and the motor neurons.

        Sex-biased parasitism was present in monogamous arctic foxes and these differences were linked to variation in the diet between males and females. More specifically, cestodes were more abundant in male arctic foxes, particularly subadult males, although nematode loads did Cited by: 7.   I was in Europe and I was walking around town with my brother, when we saw this man with his dog walking around. His dog looked almost exactly like an Arctic Fox, but its coat had a hint of gray. It was small, ears and snout like an Arctic Fox, puffy tail like an Arctic Fox and so on. I asked him, but then i forgot once I've gotten home. He said something "___ collie" or "____ shepherd" or.

      Vildtbiologisk Station, Kalø blev i oprettet under Landbrugsministeriet med det formål at drive vildtforskning. I blev Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) oprettet som sektorforskningsinstitution ved sammenlægning af fem speciallaboratorier under Miljøstyrelsen (Havforureningslaboratoriet, Ferskvandslaboratoriet, Luftforureningslaboratoriet, Analytisk-kemisk Laboratorium og. Fully grown arctic foxes weigh from 6 to 10 pounds. They average 43 inches ( cm) in length including the tail, which is about 15 inches (38 cm) long. Their short legs and body, short ears, and dense winter fur give them a stocky appearance compared to their relative, the red fox (Vulpes fulva). Arctic foxes .


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Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and Denmark by Helen Grue Download PDF EPUB FB2

Grue, H., and B. Jensen. Annular structures in canine tooth cementum in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes L.) of known age. Danish Review of Game Biology 8. Google ScholarCited by:   The Arctic Fox's Journey (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 1) Wendy Pfeffer. Kindle Edition.

$ Next. Editorial Reviews Review. This high interest informational series offers young readers a full picture into the lives of familiar polar animals.

Each page features a vibrant photograph and two descriptive sentences/5(24). annual cementum lines in the roots of canine teeth (Grue & Jensen ; Allen & Melfi ).

Results Of the Arctic foxes collected, 28 (16 females and 12 males) were blue and 13 (6 females and 7 males) were white; 31 foxes were from the sea ice period and 10 foxes from the period with open water.

No significant differ-Cited by: Canine teeth from foxes (Alopex lagopus) trapped in the Canadian arctic were aged by counting annular layers in the cementum.

Of teeth examined by this method, were from foxes. Levels and congener pattern of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in samples of subcutaneous fat and liver from 27 polar foxes, Alopex lagopus, caught in Svalbard during the winter –In all the samples analysed the composition of individual PCB congeners was studied by comparison with 12 individual PCB congeners (IUPAC nos.

28, 52,Cited by: The supernumerary teeth in the adults were found at the locus of C'(1 case, %), P1 (1 case, %) and M5 (2 cases, %). Teeth were missing also in the adult bat-eared foxes (5 cases, %). This is a picture showing the structure of the Arctic fox and showing how its body, helps it survive the harsh Arctic winters.

Ears: Its ears are small, and furry, the fur is also on the inside of the eat, protecting the ear drums from cold, also the size of the ears, means there is a smaller surface space to become cold. Legs: Its legs are also small and short, the small surface area prevents.

Arctic Fox The arctic fox has many different adaptations that can help it survive in its environment that it is located in. Its thick coat which is white in colour is one of its main aims to throw predators off and away from it because it is camouflage and is the same colour as its environment.

using arctic fox DNA can help us understand how foxes live and how they move between populations, so we can develop better management plans.

The major goals of this project were to find out 1) how island fox populations are related to mainland populations, 2) how prey influences the way arctic foxes move, and 3) how arctic foxes mate and den.

The Arctic Fox has many unique adaptations. For example, it’s white, thick, fur and fluffy tail help it survive in it’s harsh habitat. Another special adaptation the Arctic Fox has is their small pointy ears that help them hear prey moving underground. Well, the Arctic Fox has way better hearing than us.

I think the coolest adaptation ofFile Size: KB. Concentrations and patterns of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls in arctic foxes During emaciation arctic foxes rely on the energy released from their fat deposits (Fuglei et al., B.

JensenAnnual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus L.) from Greenland and by: 4. The arctic fox is an incredibly hardy animal that can survive frigid Arctic temperatures as low as –58°F in the treeless lands where it makes its home.

It has furry soles, short ears, and a. Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and DenmarkDan.

Rev. Game Biol. Grue, H. and Jensen, B. Review of the formation of incremental lines in tooth cementum of terrestrial mammalsDan. Rev. Game Biol. Age of foxes ≥1 year was estimated by examination of annual lines in the cementum of canine teeth that had been sectioned and stained (Grue and Jensen ); foxes pulp cavity of canine teeth (Bradley et al.

).Cited by:   Author of Annular structures in canine tooth cementum in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes L.) of known age, Non-seasonal incremental lines in tooth cementum of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris L.), Review of the formation of incremental lines in tooth cementum of terrestrial mammals, Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland.

Pictures on the middle row are from an arctic fox of unknown age with worn but complete teeth and show a TCI of 4 (incisives: complete (IS = 0) and worn (IW = 1) ; canines: complete (CS = 0) and worn (CW = 1) ; molars and premolars: complete (MS = 0) and worn (MW =1): sum (TCI) = 3).Cited by: 3.

Changes in the survival parameters of the red fox were analyzed at different phases of the population cycle. It was found that the survival rate in all age classes, including newborns, drastically increased at the phase of population growth.

The relationship between the general mortality rate and population size was determined. A hypothesis concerning the mechanism of these changes in the Cited by: 3. The structural adaptations of the arctic fox are unique and important for its survival in the arctic regions.

The key adaptations of the arctic fox are its thick fur [which is the warmest of all mammals], the thick fur on the bottom of its paw so it can give extra grip when it is running on the ice Its weight, size and short muzzle and ears.

Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and Denmark. Danish Review of Game Biology – Danish Review of Cited by: 7.

A review of mammalian age determination methods. MORRIS. Zoology Department, Royal Holloway College, Egham, Surrey Age Estimation of Live Arctic Foxes Vulpes lagopus Based on Teeth Condition, Wildlife Biology,1, (wlb), ( by the dentition patterns and annual lines in the tooth cementum, Journal of Species Research, 2Cited by:.

Arctic Foxes have many structural adaptations in order to survive such a cold environment. Firstly, they're quick and quiet to catch their prey with sharp teeth for holding its meal. A thick white and a thin brown coat enables an Arctic Fox to blend into its surroundings (ie the snow and the rocks) to both protect itself from predators and to.canine teeth, as noted also by Grue and Jensen () and Bradley et al.

(). Ages of the adults and of specimens not certainly identified as young were determined by counting the number of annual layers of.

cementum in thin, finely ground, sagittal sections of the roots of the upper canine teeth, exam- ined under Ox magnification.Annual cementum structures in canine teeth in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus (L.)) from Greenland and DenmarkDan.

Age estimation of live arctic foxes Vulpes lagopus based on teeth condition Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of fatty acids in adipose tissue as indicators of dietary history in wild Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) on Svalbard.